Publicity

 


Story

Haven Hospital is having trouble living up to its name.  Staff and patients alike live in fear of Matron’s (Hattie Jacques) footsteps coming down the hall.

Journalist Ted York (Terence Longdon) is rushed to Haven Hospital with appendicitis.  While he is in there York’s editor commissions the journalist to write a series of articles based on hospital life.  He is not short of inspiration: Boxer Bernie Bishop (Kenneth Connor), is rushed into hospital with an injured hand following another disastrous fight; Mister Hinton (Charles Hawtrey) spends his days plugged into the hospital radio, shutting out the clamour of the ward and the bookish Oliver Reckitt (Kenneth Williams) is struggling to come to terms with his feelings for his friend’s sister Jill (Jill Ireland). 

A Peter Rogers Production
Directed by Gerald Thomas

1959
Black & White

Screenplay: Norman Hudis (Based on an idea by Patrick Cargill & Jack Searle)
Music: Bruce Montgomery
Certificate U
86 minutes

Dorothy Denton - Shirley Eaton
Bernie Bishop Kenneth Connor
Hinton - Charles Hawtrey
Matron - Hattie Jacques
Ted York - Terence Longdon
Percy Hickson - Bill Owen
Jack Bell - Leslie Phillips
Stella Dawson - Joan Sims
Georgie Axwell - Susan Stephen
Oliver Reckitt - Kenneth Williams
The Colonel - Wilfred Hyde-White
Frances James - Susan Beaumont
Norm - Norman Rossington
Jill Thompson - Jill Ireland
Sister - Joan Hickson
Helen Lloyd - Ann Firbank
Marge Hickson - Irene Handl
Jane Bishop - Susan Shaw
George - Michael Medwin
 

 

"The Carry On which caused a national sensation when a daffodil replaced a thermometer - you know where!!! The Carry On team have picked up their stethoscopes and bed pans for a strong dose of hospital humour.  Hattie Jacques is the infamous matron, doing battle with the patients in the second of the world famous Carry On series, starring Kenneth Connor, Charles Hawtrey, Leslie Phillips and Joan Sims as the bewildered Nurse Dawson."

 

Review

The premise of Carry On Nurse is nothing new. Once more, we have a group of strangers thrown together in to a situation where they have to learn to work together to overcome adversity.  As in Carry On Sergeant, it is really the developing characters who grab the audience attention. 

Kenneth Williams, Charles Hawtrey, Joan Sims, Shirley Eaton, Hattie Jacques and Bill Owen work brilliantly together, sparking off each other in every scene.  The situation and plot become secondary to the spectacle of the cast doing what they do best and it is there that Carry On Nurse, like so many other Carry Ons, really makes an impact.

Where Carry On Nurse is less successful is in the way it continually tries to tug at the viewer’s heart strings.  The early Carry Ons are often accused of being overly sentimental, even mawkish, and Carry On Nurse is without doubt the worst offender.  There’s the love story between York and Nurse Denton, the growing romance between Reckitt and Jill, Bernie Bishop’s tender moment with his son at the end of the film and plenty more little tear-jerkers along the way.  There is simply too much emotion coming from too many different characters.  Nevertheless, Carry On Nurse remains a delightfully intimate film which, despite slipping into the odd moment of soppiness, is never too far away from a gag or a spot of sauciness.